KRAM/WEISSHAAR

BREEDING TABLES

AT DESIGN MUSEUM LONDON

BREEDING TABLES

AT DESIGN MUSEUM LONDON

At the invitation Libby Sellers, curator of London’s Design Museum, April 2006 saw KRAM/WEISSHAAR design a site-specific installation exhibiting the potential for limitless variation within BREEDING TABLES for the Tank – the all glass gallery situated outside the building on the banks of the river Thames. The curatorial statement, below, outlines BREEDING TABLES’ ability to merge the “idiosyncratic charm of hand-crafted objects” with the machinery of mass manufacturing:

“Throughout the 20th Century advances in technology enabled designers and manufacturers to produce standardised products in such large quantities that they were affordable to millions of people. At the start of the 21st Century technology has become so sophisticated that today’s designers are using it to create customised products, each with a distinctive identity, at the same speed and volume as traditional mass manufacturing.

“Among them are the German-Swedish design team of Reed Kram and Clemens Weisshaar, who work together from their respective studios in Stockholm and Munich. For this BREEDING TABLES project Kram/Weisshaar programmed computer design software to act ‘as a kind of digital sweatshop, constantly shooting out proposals from which we choose and refine the most promising.’ Using algorithmic modelling sequences and CNC (computer numerically controlled) production they created—or bred—an infinite number of table shapes based on a set criteria of height, structure and stability.

“Once the tables were cut and shaped by machine, each of their powder coated steel components was handfinished by skilled technicians. Kram and Weisshaar regard this process of merging mass manufacturing, hand craftsmanship and infinite design possibilities as a new model for combining the efficiency of an industrial assembly line with the idiosyncratic charm of hand-crafted objects while sustaining the skills of local craftspeople.”
(Libby Sellers, Curator, the Design Museum, London)